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Hard work is key to success for Jacob’s Village Farm Corp.

It was 20 years ago that Jacob Yosofov founded Jacob’s Village Farm Corp., a wholesale distributor with 15,000 square feet of cold storage space in Brooklyn, NY, specializing in tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, and eventually expanding into peaches, stone fruit, berries and other popular produce items. In fact, its giro pack machine now packs citrus, avocados and apples in several net mesh bagging styles.

The company also provides mandarins out of California, which it brings to Brooklyn and packs under its own label.

“We have a lot of fruit coming from Mexico and Canada, as well as stuff coming in from California, New Jersey and local here in New York,” Yosofov said. “We aim to do what we can to fill our customers’ orders. If they need something at two in the morning, we’re going to go get it for them. Even if we don’t have it, we’ll find a way to get it to them.”

IMG 0276 The company also found success in branching out, operating 15 acres of mini cucumbers in the Dominican Republic’s mountains of Rancho Arriba, something that started only a year ago. The weather in the Dominican Republic provides ideal growing conditions with cool weather in the nights, Yosofov said, so he’s been happy with what’s happening there.

“It’s doing well. We’re not moving as much as we first were, but we found our niche there,” Yosofov said. “We were very inexperienced at first and we were bringing too much. Now, we know what we can handle and what our customers are looking for. That experience has helped us a great deal.”

Other growth initiatives have been expanding into Asian and Middle Eastern retail chain business, and expanding its warehouse facility as well. It’s also building a distribution facility in Elizabeth, NJ that will handle all the company’s customers in the Garden State. That’s currently slated to open this summer.

“We’re excited about all of this. It’s what people are asking for — everyone wants a full line,” Yosofov said. “Since we are bringing a full line, we need more space to fulfill our customers’ needs as best we can.”

The biggest challenge has been having trucks come on time and it’s something that the company wishes wasn’t so problematic because it never wants to disappoint a customer who is expecting a delivery.

“Success comes from being on board with everything. It’s not like it used to be in the olden days where you didn’t have to market yourself,” Yosofov said. “Today, you need to brand yourself and get your name out there. We have seen that exposure work for us and once customers come on board, they are happy.”

Being successful also takes a great deal of hustle, and Yosofov and his team work hard daily and are always willing to go the extra mile for its customers.

“This business can be hard and if you don’t know what you are doing, you’re not going to make it. You have to work hard, and if you’re not going to be up at four in the morning taking orders, you’re not going to find success,” he said. “You need to be up and running.”